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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Full


FULL, adjective

1. Replete; having within its limits all that it can contain; as a vessel full of liquor.

2. Abounding with; having a large quantity or abundance; as a house full of furniture; life is full of cares and perplexities.

3. Supplied; not vacant.

Had the throne been full their meeting would not have been regular.

4. Plump; fat; as a full body.

5. Saturated; sated.

I am full of the burnt offerings of rams. Isaiah 1:11.

6. Crowded, with regard to the imagination or memory.

Every one is full of the miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions.

7. Large; entire; not partial; that fills; as a full meal.

8. Complete; entire; not defective or partial; as the full accomplishment of a prophecy.

9. Complete; entire; without abatement.

It came to pass, at the end of two full years, that Pharoah dreamed - Genesis 41:1.

10. Containing the whole matter; expressing the whole; as a full narration or description.

11. Strong; not faint or attenuated; loud; clear; distinct; as a full voice or sound.

12. Mature; perfect; as a person of full age.

13. Entire; complete; denoting the completion of a sentence; as a full stop or point.

14. Spread to view in all dimensions; as a head drawn with a full face.

15. Exhibiting the whole disk or surface illuminated; as the full moon.

16. Abundant; plenteous; sufficient. We have a full supply of provisions for the year.

17. Adequate; equal; as a full compensation or reward for labor.

18. Well fed.

19. Well supplied or furnished; abounding.

20. Copious; ample. The speaker or the writer was full upon that point.

A full band, in music, is when all the voices and instruments are employed.

A full organ, is when all or most of the stops are out.

FULL, noun

1. Complete measure; utmost extent. this instrument answers to the full

2. The highest state or degree.

The swan's down feather, that stands upon the swell at full of tide -

3. The whole; the total; in the phrase, at full

4. The state of satiety; as fed to the full

The full of the moon, is the time when it presents to the spectator its whole face illuminated, as it always does when in opposition to the sun.

FULL, adverb

1. Quite; to the same degree; without abatement or diminution.

The pawn I proffer shall be full as good.

2. With the whole effect.

The diapason closing full in man.

3. Exactly.

FULL in the center of the sacred wood.

4. Directly; as, he looked him full in the face.

It is placed before adjectives and adverbs to heighten or strengthen their signification; as full sad.

FULL well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. Mark 7:9.

FULL is prefixed to other words, chiefly participles, to express utmost extent or degree.