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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Loach


LOACH,

LOAD, noun [See lade.]

1. A burden; that which is laid on or put in any thing for conveyance. Thus we lay a load on a beat or on a man's shoulders, or on a cart or wagon; and we say, a light load, heavy load. A load then is indefinite in quantity or weight. But by usage, in some cases, the word has a more definite signification, and expresses a certain quantity or weight, or as much as is usually carried, or as can be well sustained. Load is never used for the cargo of a ship; this is called loading, lading, freight, or cargo.

2. Any heavy burden; a large quantity borne or sustained. a tree may be said to have a load of fruit upon it.

3. That which is borne with pain or difficulty; a grievous weight; encumbrance; in a literal sense.

Jove lightened of its load th' enormous mass -

In a figurative sense, we say, a load of care or grief; a load of guilt or crimes.

4. Weight or violence of blows.

5. A quantity of food or drink that oppresses, or as much as can be borne.

6. Among miners, the quantity of nine dishes of ore, each dish being about half a hundred weight.

LOAD, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive loaded. [loaden, formerly used, is obsolete and laden belongs to lade. Load, from the noun, is a regular verb.]

1. To lay on a burden; to put on or in something to be carried, or as much as can be carried; as, to load a camel or a horse; to load a cart or wagon. To load a gun, is to charge, or to put in a sufficient quantity of powder, or powder and ball or shot.

2. To encumber; to lay on or put in that which is borne with pain or difficulty; in a literal sense, as to load the stomach with meat; or in a figurative sense, as to load the mind or memory.

3. To make heavy by something added or appended.

Thy dreadful vow, loaden with death -

So in a literal sense, to load a whip.

4. To bestow or confer on in great abundance; as, to load one with honors; to load with reproaches.