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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Place


PLACE, noun

1. A particular portion of space of indefinite extent, occupied or intended to be occupied by any person or thing, and considered as the space where a person or thing does or may rest or has rested, as distinct from space in general.

Look from the place where thou art. Genesis 13:3.

The place where thou standest is holy ground. Exodus 3:5.

Every place whereon the soles of your feet shall tread shall be yours. .11.

David's place was empty. 1 Samuel 20:19.

2. Any portion of space, as distinct from space in general.

Enlargement and deliverance shall arise to the Jews from another place Esther 4:14.

3. Local existence.

From whose face the earth and the heaven fled away, and there was found no place for them. Revelation 20:11.

4. Separate room or apartment.

His catalogue had an especial place for sequestered divines.

5. Seat; residence; mansion.

The Romans shall come and take away both our place and nation. John 11:6.

6. A portion or passage of writing or of a book.

The place of the Scripture which he read was this. Acts 8:32.

7. Point or degree in order of proceeding; as in the first place; in the second place; in the last place Hence,

8. Rank; order of priority, dignity or importance. He holds the first place in society, or in the affections of the people.

9. Office, employment; official station. The man has a place under the government.

Do you your office, or give up your place

10. Ground; room.

There is no place of doubting but that it is the very same.

11. Station in life; calling; occupation; condition. All, in their several places, perform their duty.

12. A city, a town; a village. In what place does he reside? He arrived at this place in the mail coach. Genesis 18:24.

13. In military affairs, a fortified town or post; a fortress; a fort; as a strong place; a place easily defended. The place was taken by assault.

14. A country; a kingdom. England is the place of his birth.

15. Space in general.

But she all place within herself confines.

16. Room; stead; with the sense of substitution.

And Joseph said unto them, fear not; for am I in the place of God? Gen 1.

17. Room; kind reception.

My word hath no place in you. John 8:37.

18. The place of the moon, in astronomy, is the part of its orbit where it is found at any given time. The place of the sun or a star, is the sign and degree of the zodiac, in which it is at any given time, or the degree of the ecliptic, reckoning from the beginning of Aries, which the star's circle of longitude cuts, and therefore coincides with the longitude of the sun or star.

To take place to come; to happen; to come into actual existence or operation; as when we say, this or that event will or will not take place The perfect exemption of man from calamity can never take place in this state of existence.

1. To take the precedence or priority.

take the place but sometimes to take place omitting the article, is to occupy the place or station of another.

To have place to have a station, room or seat. Such desires can have no place in a good heart.

1. To have actual existence.

To give place to make room or way. Give place to your superiors.

1. To give room; to give advantage; to yield to the influence of; to listen to.

Neither give place to the devil. Ephesians 4:27.

2. To give way; to yield to and suffer to pass away.

High place in Scripture, a mount on which sacrifices were offered.

PLACE, verb transitive To put or set in a particular part of space, or in a particular part of the earth, or in something on its surface; to locate; as, to place a house by the side of a stream; to place a book on a shelf; to place a body of cavalry on each flank of any army.

1. To appoint, set, induct or establish in an office.

Thou shalt provide out of all the people able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating covetousness; and place such over them to be rulers of thousands, etc. Exodus 18:21.

It is a high moral duty of sovereigns and supreme magistrates and councils, to place in office men of unquestionable virtue and talents.

2. To put or set in any particular rank, state or condition. Some men are placed in a condition of rank and opulence, others are placed in low or narrow circumstances; but in whatever sphere men are placed, contentment will insure to them a large portion of happiness.

3. To set; to fix; as, to place one's affections on an object; to place confidence in a friend.

4. To put; to invest; as, to place money in the funds or in a bank.

5. To put out at interest; to lend; as, to place money in good hands or in good security.