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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Treat


TREAT, verb transitive [Latin tracto.]

1. To handle; to manage; to use. Subjects are usually faithful or treacherous, according as they are well or ill treated. To treat prisoners ill, is the characteristic of barbarians. Let the wife of your bosom be kindly treated.

2. To handle in a particular manner, in writing or speaking; as, to treat a subject diffusely.

3. To entertain without expense to the guest.

4. To negotiate; to settle; as, to treat a peace. [Not in use.]

5. To manage in the application of remedies; as, to treat a disease or a patient.

TREAT, verb intransitive To discourse; to handle in writing or speaking; to make discussion. Cicero treats of the nature of the gods; he treats of old age and of duties.

1. To come to terms of accommodation.

Inform us, will the emp'ror treat?

2. To make gratuitous entertainment. It is sometimes the custom of military officers to treat when first elected.

To treat with, to negotiate; to make and receive proposals for adjusting differences. Envoys were appointed to treat with France, but without success.

TREAT, noun An entertainment given; as a parting treat

1. Something given for entertainment; as a rich treat

2. Emphatically, a rich entertainment.