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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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The All American Dictionary

Americal Dictionary of the English Language
  • Webster's 1828 Dictionary contains the foundation of America's heritage and principal beliefs. It is contemporary with the American Constitution.
  • It is an excellent reference for classical literature, Bible studies, history papers, and the ground work of explanation and reasoning for America's national documents.
  • Christian readers will find it rewarding to compare Webster's definitions of such words as: marriage, education, sin, law, faith, and prayer, with those given in any modern dictionary. The difference gives an appreciation of early American values.
  • A breath of fresh air in an era of political correctness and subjectivism.

Word of the Day:

Scoff

SCOFF, verb intransitive [Gr. The primary sense is probably to throw. But I do not find the word in the English and Greek sense, in any modern language except the English.]

To treat with insolent ridicule, mockery or contumelious language; to manifest contempt by derision; with at. To scoff at religion and sacred things is evidence of extreme weakness and folly, as well as of wickedness.

They shall scoff at the kings. Habakkuk 1:10.

SCOFF, verb transitive To treat with derision or scorn.

SCOFF, noun Derision, ridicule, mockery or reproach, expressed in language of contempt; expression of scorn or contempt.

With scoffs and scorns and contumelious taunts.