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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Pride


PRIDE, noun

1. Inordinate self-esteem; an unreasonable conceit of one's own superiority in talents, beauty, wealth, accomplishments, rank or elevation in office, which manifests itself in lofty airs, distance, reserve, and often in contempt of others.

Martial pride looks down on industry.

PRIDE goeth before destruction. Proverbs 16:18.

PRIDE that dines on vanity, sups on contempt.

All pride is abject and mean.

Those that walk in pride he is able to abase. Daniel 4:37.

2. Insolence; rude treatment of others; insolent exultation.

That hardly we escap'd the pride of France.

3. Generous elation of heart; a noble self-esteem springing from a consciousness of worth.

The honest pride of conscious virtue.

4. Elevation; loftiness.

A falcon tow'ring in her pride of place.

5. Decoration; ornament; beauty displayed.

Whose lofty trees, clad with summer's pride

Be his this sword

Whose ivory sheath, inwrought with curious pride

Adds graceful terror to the wearer's side.

6. Splendid show; ostentation.

Is this array, the war of either side

Through Athens pass'd with military pride

7. That of which men are proud; that which excites boasting.

I will cut off the pride of the Philistines. Zechariah 9:6. Zephaniah 3:11.

8. Excitement of the sexual appetite in a female beast.

9. Proud persons. Psalms 36:11.

PRIDE, verb transitive With the reciprocal pronoun, to pride one's self, to indulge pride; to take pride; to value one's self; to gratify self-esteem. They pride themselves in their wealth, dress or equipage. He prides himself in his achievements.