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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Sin


SIN, noun

1. The voluntary departure of a moral agent from a known rule of rectitude or duty, prescribed by God; any voluntary transgression of the divine law, or violation of a divine command; a wicked act; iniquity. sin is either a positive act in which a known divine law is violated, or it is the voluntary neglect to obey a positive divine command, or a rule of duty clearly implied in such command. sin comprehends not action only, but neglect of known duty, all evil thoughts purposes, words and desires, whatever is contrary to God's commands or law. 1 John 3:4. Matthew 12:31. James 4:17. Sinner neither enjoy the pleasures of nor the peace of piety.

Among divines, sin is original or actual. Actual sin above defined, is the act of a moral agent in violating a known rule of duty. Original sin as generally understood, is native depravity of heart to the divine will, that corruption of nature of deterioration of the moral character of man, which is supposed to be the effect of Adam's apostasy; and which manifests itself in moral agents by positive act of disobedience to the divine will, or by the voluntary neglect to comply with the express commands of God, which require that we should love God with all the heart and soul and strength and mind, and our neighbor as ourselves. This native depravity or alienation of affections from God and his law, is supposed to be what the apostle calls the carnal mind or mindedness, which is enmity against God, and is therefore denominated sin or sinfulness.

Unpardonable sin or blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, is supposed to be a malicious and obstinate rejection of Christ and the gospel plan of salvation, or a contemptuous resistance made to the influences and convictions of the Holy Spirit. Matthew 12:31.

2. A sin-offering; an offering made to atone for sin He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin 2 Corinthians 5:21.

3. A man enormously wicked. [Not in use.]

4. sin differs from crime, not in nature, but in application. That which is a crime against society, is sin against God.

SIN, verb intransitive

1. To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or non-observance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty.

All have sinned and come short of the glory of God. Romans 3:9. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned. Psalms 51:2.

2. To offend against right, against men or society; to trespass.

I am a man more sinn'd against than sinning. And who but wishes to invert the laws of order, sins against the' eternal cause. (Shakespeare)

And who but wishes to invert the laws of order, sins against th' eternal cause. (Alexander Pope)

SIN, for since, obsolete or vulgar.