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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Voice


VOICE, noun [Latin vox; voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is that which is driven out.]

1. Sound or audible noise uttered by the mouth, either of human beings or of other animals. We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear; the voice of a woman is soft or musical; the voice of a dog is loud or harsh; the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious. The voice of human beings is articulate; that of beasts, inarticulate. The voices of men are different, and when uttered together, are often dissonant.

2. Any sound made by the breath; as the trumpet's voice

3. A vote; suffrage; opinion or choice expressed. Originally voice was the oral utterance of choice, but it now signifies any vote however given.

Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice of holy senates, and elect by voice

I have no words; my voice is in my sword.

4. Language; words; expression.

Let us call on God in the voice of his church.

5. In Scripture, command; precept.

Ye would not be obedient to the voice of the Lord your God. Deuteronomy 8:20.

6. Sound.

After the fire, a still small voice 1 Kings 19:12.

Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Job 40:9.

The floods have lifted up their voice Psalms 93:3.

7. Language; tone; mode of expression.

I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice Galatians 4:20.

8. In grammar, a particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs; as the active voice; the passive voice

VOICE, verb transitive

1. To rumor; to report.

It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. [Little used.]

2. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.

3. To vote.

VOICE, verb intransitive To clamor; to exclaim. obsolete