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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Brush


BRUSH, noun

1. An instrument for cleaning any thing of dust and dirt by light rubbing, as floors, furniture, boots, etc. Brushes originally were made of shrubs or small branches of trees tied together, and such are yet used for coarse purposes. But the materials most used are bristles set in wood. Painters use a small brush to lay colors on their large pieces. Silversmiths use a wire brush for scrubbing silver, copper or brass, in order to gilding; and there is a method of staining leather by rubbing the color on the skin with a brush

2. Branches of trees lopped off; brushwood; a sense common in the U. States.

3. The small trees and shrubs of a wood; or a thicket of small trees.

4. A skirmish; a slight encounter; also, an assault; a shock, or rude treatment, from collision; as we say a scouring, a rub.

5. In electricity, the luminous appearance of electric matter issuing in diverging rays from a point.

6. A tail; as the brush of a fox.

BRUSH, verb transitive To sweep or rub with a brush; as, to brush a hat.

1. To strike as with a brush; to strike lightly, by passing over the surface, without injury, or impression; as, to brush the arm in passing; to brush the briny flood.

2. To paint with a brush; hence, to brush up is often used for cleansing in general.

3. With off, to remove by brushing, as to brush off dust; also, to carry away by an act like that of brushing, or by passing over lightly, as by wind.

4. To move as a brush; to pass over with a light contact.

BRUSH, verb intransitive To move nimbly in haste; to move so lightly as scarcely to be perceived; as, to brush by.

1. To move or skim over, with a slight contact, or without much impression.