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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Challenge

CHALLENGE, noun Literally, a calling, or crying out, the primary sense of many words expressing a demand, as claim. Hence appropriately,

1. A calling upon one to fight in single combat; an invitation or summons, verbal or written, to decide a controversy by a duel. Hence the letter containing the summons is also called a challenge

2. A claim or demand made of a right or supposed right.

There must be no challenge of superiority.

3. Among hunters, the opening and crying of hounds at the first finding the scent of their game.

4. In law, an exception to jurors; the claim of a party that certain jurors shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause; that is, a calling them off. The right of challenge is given both in civil and criminal trials, for certain causes which are supposed to disqualify a juror to be an impartial judge. The right of challenge extends either to the whole panel or array, or only to particular jurors, called a challenge to the polls. A principal challenge is that which the law allows without cause assigned. A challenge to the favor, is when the party alleges a special cause. In criminal cases, a prisoner may challenge twenty jurors, without assigning a cause. This is called a peremptory challenge

CHALLENGE, VT

1. To call, invite or summon to answer for an offense by single combat, or duel.

2. To call to a contest; to invite to a trial; as, I challenge a man to prove what he asserts, implying defiance.

3. To accuse; to call to answer.

4. To claim as due; to demand as a right; as, the Supreme Being challenges our reverence and homage.

5. In law, to call off a juror, or jurors; or to demand that jurors shall not sit in trial upon a cause. [See the noun.]

6. To call to the performance of conditions.