Loading...

American Dictionary of the English Language

Dictionary Search

Cock


COCK, noun

1. The male of birds, particularly of gallinaceous or domestic fowls, which having no appropriate or distinctive name, are called dunghill fowls or barn-door fowls.

2. A weather-cock; a vane in shape of a cock [It is usually called a weather-cock.]

3. A spout; an instrument to draw out or discharge liquor from a cask, vat or pipe; so named from its projection.

4. The projecting corner of a hat.

5. A small conical pile of hay, so shaped for shedding rain; called in England a cop. When hay is dry and rolled together for carting, the heaps are not generally called cocks, at least not in New England. A large conical pile is called a stack.

6. The style or gnomon of a dial.

7. The needle of a balance.

8. The piece which covers the balance in a clock or watch.

9. The notch of an arrow.

10. The part of a musket or other fire arm, to which a flint is attached, and which, being impelled by a spring, strikes fire, and opens the pan at the same time.

11. A small boat. It is now called a cock-boat, which is tautology, as cock itself is a bot.

12. A leader; a chief man.

Sir Andrew is the cock of the club.

13. Cock-crowing; the time when cocks crow in the morning.

COCK a hoop, or cock on the hoop, a phrase denoting triumph; triumphant; exulting.

COCK and a bull, a phrase denoting tedious trifling stories.

COCK, verb transitive

1. To set erect; to turn up; as, to cock the nose or ears.

2. To set the brim of a hat so as to make sharp corners or points; or to set up with an air of pertness.

3. To make up hay in small conical piles.

4. To set or draw back the cock of a gun, in order to fire.

COCK, verb intransitive

1. To hold up the head; to strut; to look big, pert, or menacing.

2. To train or use fighting cocks.

3. To cocker.