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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Comfort


COMFORT, verb transitive

1. To strengthen; to invigorate; to cheer or enliven.

Light excelleth in comforting the spirits of men.

COMFORT ye your hearts. Genesis 18:5.

2. To strengthen the mind when depressed or enfeebled; to console; to give new vigor to the spirits; to cheer, or relieve from depression, or trouble.

His friends came to mourn with him and to comfort him. Job 2:11.

3. In law, to relieve, assist or encourage, as the accessory to a crime after the fact.

COMFORT, noun

1. Relief from pain; ease; rest or moderate pleasure after pain, cold or distress or uneasiness of body. The word signifies properly new strength, or animation; and relief from pain is often the effect of strength. In a popular sense, the word signifies rather negatively the absence of pain and the consequent quiet, than positive animation.

2. Relief from distress of mind; the ease and quiet which is experienced when pain, trouble, agitation or affliction ceases. It implies also some degree of positive animation of the spirits; or some pleasurable sensations derived from hope, and agreeable prospects; consolation.

Let me alone, that I may take comfort a little. Job 10:20.

Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. Matthew 9:22.

3. Support; consolation under calamity, distress or danger.

Let thy merciful kindness be for my comfort Psalms 119:50.

4. That which gives strength or support in distress, difficulty, danger, or infirmity.

Pious children are the comfort of their aged parents.

5. In law, support; assistance; countenance; encouragement; as, an accessory affords aid or comfort to a felon.

6. That which gives security from want and furnishes moderate enjoyment; as the comforts of life.