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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

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Condemn

CONDEMN, verb transitive [Latin , to condemn to disapprove, to doom, to devote.]

1. To pronounce to be utterly wrong; to utter a sentence of disapprobation against; to censure; to blame. But the word often expresses more than censure or blame, and seems to include the idea of utter rejection; as, to condemn heretical opinions; to condemn ones conduct.

We condemn mistakes with asperity, where we pass over sins with gentleness.

2. To determine or judge to be wrong, or guilty; to disallow; to disapprove.

Beloved, if our heart condemn us not, we have confidence towards God. 1 John 3:21.

3. To witness against; to show or prove to be wrong, or guilty, by a contrary practice.

The men of Nineveh shall rise in judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it. Matthew 12:41.

4. To pronounce to be guilty; to sentence to punishment; to utter sentence against judicially; to doom; opposed to acquit or absolve; with to before the penalty.

The son of man shall be betrayed to the chief priests, and to the scribes, and they shall condemn him to death. Matthew 20:18.

He that believeth on him is not condemned. John 3:18.

5. To doom or sentence to pay a fine; to fine.

And the king of Egypt--condemned the land in a hundred talents of silver. 2 Chronicles 36:3.

6. To judge or pronounce to be unfit for use or service; as, the ship was condemned as not sea-worthy. To judge or pronounce to be forfeited; as, the ship and her cargo were condemned.