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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Confound


CONFOUND, verb transitive [Latin , to pour out. Literally, to pour or throw together.]

1. To mingle and blend different things, so that their forms or natures cannot be distinguished; to mix in a mass or crowd, so that individuals cannot be distinguished.

2. To throw into disorder.

Let us go down, and there confound their language. Genesis 11:7.

3. To mix or blend, so as to occasion a mistake of one thing for another.

A fluid body and a wetting liquor, because they agree in many things, are wont to be confounded.

Men may confound ideas with words.

4. To perplex; to disturb the apprehension by indistinctness of ideas or words.

Men may confound each other by unintelligible terms or wrong application of words.

5. To abash; to throw the mind into disorder; to cast down; to make ashamed.

Be thou confounde and ber thy shame. Ezekiel 16:52.

Saul confounded the Jews at Damascus. Acts 9:22.

6. To perplex with terror; to terrify; to dismay; to astonish; to throw into consternation; to stupify with amazement.

So spake the Son of God; and Satan stood a while as mute confounded what to say.

The multitude came together and were confounded. Acts 2:6.

7. To destroy; to overthrow.

So deep a malice to confound the race of mankind in one root.