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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Cope


COPE, noun

1. A cover for the head.

2. A sacerdotal ornament or vestment worn in sacred ministrations. An ornament worn by chanters and subchanters, when they officiate in solemnity. It reaches from the shoulders to the feet.

3. Any thing spread or extended over the head; the arch or concave of the sky; the roof or covering of a house; the arch over a door, etc.

4. An ancient tribute due to the king or lord of the soil, out of the lead mines in some part of Derbyshire.

COPE, verb transitive

1. To cover as with a cope

2. To pare the beak or talons of a hawk.

3. To embrace.

COPE, verb intransitive

1. To strive or contend on equal terms, or with equal strength; to equal in combat; to match; to oppose with success.

The Generals have not been able to cope with the troops of Athens.

Till Luther rose, no power could cope with the pope.

He was too open and direct in his conduct, and possessed too little management-to cope with so cool and skillful an adversary.

2. To contend; to strive or struggle; to combat.

Host copd with host, dire was the din of war.

3. To encounter; to interchange kindness or sentiments.

4. To make return; to reward.

5. To exchange, or barter. [Not in use.]