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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Determine

DETERMINE, verb transitive [Latin , to bound; a boundary or limit. Gr. See Term.]

1. To end; particularly, to end by the decision or conclusion of a cause, or of a doubtful or controverted point; applicable to the decisions of the mind, or to judicial decisions. We say, I had determined this question in my own mind; the court has determined the cause.

2. To end and fix; to settle ultimately; as, this event determined his fate.

3. To fix on; to settle or establish; as, to determine the proper season for planting seeds.

God--hath determined the times before appointed. Acts 17:26.

4. To end; to limit; to bound; to confine. Yonder hill determines our view. Knowledge is determined by the sight.

5. To give a direction to; to influence the choice; that is, to limit to a particular purpose or direction; as, this circumstance determined him to the study of law. Also, to give a direction to material bodies in their course; as, impulse may determine a moving body to this or that point.

6. To resolve, that is, to end or settle a point in the mind, as in Definition first.

I determined this with myself. 2 Corinthians 2:1.

Paul had determined to sail by Ephesus. Acts 20:16.

7. To destroy. [Not used.]

8. To put an end to; as, to determine a will.

9. To settle or ascertain, as something uncertain.

The character of the soul is determined by the character of its God.

DETERMINE, verb intransitive

1. To resolve; to conclude; to come to a decision.

He shall pay as the judges determine Exodus 21:22.

It is indifferent how the learned shall determine concerning this matter.

2. To end; to terminate. The danger determined by the death of the conspirators. Revolutions often determine in setting up tyranny at home, or in conquest from abroad.

Some estates may determine on future contingencies.