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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Disturb


DISTURB, verb transitive [Latin , to trouble, disorder, discompose; a crowd, a tumult; Gr., a tumult. The primary sense seems to be to stir, or to turn or whirl round.]

1. To stir; to move; to discompose; to excite from a state of rest or tranquillity. We say, the man is asleep, do not disturb him. Let the vessel stand, do not move the liquor, you will disturb the sediment. disturb not the public peace.

2. To move or agitate; to disquiet; to excite uneasiness or a slight degree of anger in the mind; to move the passions; to ruffle. The mind may be disturbed by an offense given, by misfortune, surprise, contention, discord, jealousy, envy, etc.

3. To move from any regular course or operation; to interrupt regular order; to make irregular. It has been supposed that the approach of a comet may disturb the motions of the planets in their orbits. An unexpected cause may disturb a chemical operation, or the operation of medicine.

4. To interrupt; to hinder; to incommode. Care disturbs study. Let no person disturb my franchise.

5. To turn off from any direction; with from. [Unusual.]

--And disturb his inmost counsels from their destind aim.

DISTURB, noun Confusion; disorder. [Not used.]