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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

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Drink

DRINK, verb intransitive preterit tense and participle passive drank. Old preterit tense And participle passive drunk; participle passive Drunken. [G. drink and drench are radically the same word, and probably drown. We observe that n is not radical.]

1. To swallow liquor, for quenching thirst or other purpose; as, to drink of the brook.

Ye shall indeed drink of my cup. Matthew 20:22.

2. To take spirituous liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be a habitual drunkard.

3. To feast; to be entertained with liquors.

To drink to,

1. To salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; as, I drink to you grace.

2. To wish well to, in the act of taking the cup.

DRINK, verb transitive

1. To swallow, as liquids; to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; as, to drink water or wine.

2. To suck in; to absorb; to imbibe.

And let the purple violets drink the stream.

3. To take in by any inlet; to hear; to see; as, to drink words or the voice.

I drink delicious poison from thy eye.

4. To take in air; to inhale.

To drink down, is to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness.

To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial.

To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet.

To drink up, to drink the whole.

To drink health, or to the health, a customary civility in which a person at taking a glass or cup, expresses his respect or kind wishes for another.

DRINK, noun Liquor to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach, for quenching thirst, or for medicinal purposes; as water, wine, beer, cider, decoctions, etc.