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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Dull


DULL, adjective [G.]

1. Stupid; doltish; blockish; slow of understanding; as a lad of dull genius.

2. Heavy; sluggish; without life or spirit; as a surfeit leaves a man very dull

3. Slow of motion; sluggish; as a dull stream.

4. Slow of hearing or seeing; as dull of hearing; dull of seeing.

5. Slow to learn or comprehend; unready; awkward; as a dull scholar.

6. Sleepy; drowsy.

7. Sad; melancholy.

8. Gross; cloggy; insensible; as the dull earth.

9. Not pleasing or delightful; not exhilarating; cheerless; as, to make dictionaries is dull work.

10. Not bright or clear; clouded; tarnished; as, the mirror is dull

11. Not bright; not briskly burning; as a dull fire.

12 Dim; obscure; not vivid; as a dull light.

13. Blunt; obtuse; having a thick edge; as a dull knife or ax.

14. Cloudy; overcast; not clear; not enlivening; as dull weather.

15. With seamen, being without wind; as, a ship has a dull time.

16. Not lively or animated; as a dull eye.

DULL, verb transitive

1. To make dull; to stupify; as, to dull the senses.

2. To blunt; as, to dull a sword or an ax.

3. To make sad or melancholy.

4. To hebetate; to make insensible or slow to perceive; as, to dull the ears; to dull the wits.

5. To damp; to render lifeless; as, to dull the attention.

6. To make heavy or slow of motion; as, to dull industry.

7. To sully; to tarnish or cloud; as, the breath dulls a mirror.

DULL, verb intransitive To become dull or blunt; to become stupid.