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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Expose


EXPO'SE, verb transitive s as z. [Latin expositum, from expono; ex and pono, to place. The radical sense of pono is to set or place, or rather to throw or thrust down. To expose is to set or throw open, or to thrust forth.]

1. To lay open; to set to public view; to disclose; to uncover or draw from concealment; as, to expose the secret artifices of a court; to expose a plan or design.

2. To make bare; to uncover; to remove from any thing that which guards or protects; as, to expose the head or the breast to the air.

3. To remove from shelter; to place in a situation to be affected or acted on; as, to expose one's self to violent heat.

4. To lay open to attack, by any means; as, to expose an army or garrison.

5. To make liable; to subject; as, to expose one's self to pain, grief or toil; to expose one's self to insult.

6. To put in the power of; as, to expose one's self to the seas.

7. To lay open to censure, ridicule or contempt.

A fool might once himself alone expose

8. To lay open, in almost any manner; as, to expose one's self to examination or scrutiny.

9. To put in danger. The good soldier never shrinks from exposing himself, when duty requires it.

10. To cast out to chance; to place abroad, or in a situation unprotected. Some nations expose their children.

11. To lay open; to make public. Be careful not unnecessarily to expose the faults of a neighbor.

12. To offer; to place in a situation to invite purchasers; as, to expose goods to sale.

13. To offer to inspection; as, to expose paintings in a gallery.