Loading...

American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Dictionary Search

Feast


FEAST, noun [Latin festum.]

1. A sumptuous repast or entertainment, of which a number of guests partake; particularly, a rich or splendid public entertainment.

On Pharaoh's birth day, he made a feast to all his servants. Genesis 40:20.

2. A rich or delicious repast or meal; something delicious to the palate.

3. A ceremony of feasting; joy and thanksgiving on stated days, in commemoration of some great event, or in honor of some distinguished personage; an anniversary, periodical or stated celebration of some event; a festival; as on occasion of the games in Greece, and the feast of the passover, the feast of Pentecost, and the feast of tabernacles among the Jews.

4. Something delicious and entertaining to the mind or soul; as the dispensation of the gospel is called a feast of fat things. Isaiah 25:6.

5. That which delights and entertains.

He that is of a merry heart hath a continual feast

Proverbs 15:15.

In the English church, feasts are immovable or movable; immovable, when they occur on the same day of the year, as Christmas day, etc.; and movable, when they are not confined to the same day of the year, as Easter, which regulates many others.

FEAST, verb intransitive

1. To eat sumptuously; to dine or sup on rich provisions; particularly in large companies, and on public festivals.

And his sons went and feasted in their houses. Job 1:4.

2. To be highly gratified or delighted.

FEAST, verb transitive

1. To entertain with sumptuous provisions; to treat at the table magnificently; as, he was feasted by the king.

2. To delight; to pamper; to gratify luxuriously; as, to feast the soul.

Whose taste or smell can bless the feasted sense.