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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Fight


FIGHT, verb intransitive

1. To strive or contend for victory, in battle or in single combat; to attempt to defeat, subdue or destroy an enemy, either by blows or weapons; to contend in arms.

Come and be our captain, that we may fight with the children of Ammon. Judges 11:6.

When two persons or parties contend in person, fight is usually followed by with. But when we speak of carrying on war, in any other form, we may say, to fight against.

Saul took the kingdom over Israel, and fought against all his enemies on every side. 1 Samuel 14:1.

Hazael king of Syria went up, and fought against Gath.

2 Kings 12:1.

It is treason for a man to join an enemy to fight against his country.

To fight against, is to act in opposition; to oppose; to strive to conquer or resist.

The stars in their courses fought against Sisera. Judges 5:20.

2. To contend; to strive; to struggle to resist or check.

3. To act as a soldier.

FIGHT, verb transitive

1. To carry on contention; to maintain a struggle for victory over enemies.

I have fought a good fight 2 Timothy 4:7.

2. To contend with in battle; to war against. They fought the enemy in two pitched battles. The captain fought the frigate seven glasses. [Elliptical; with being understood.]

FIGHT, noun

1. A battle; an engagement; a contest in arms; a struggle for victory, either between individuals, or between armies, ships or navies. A duel is called a single fight or combat.

2. Something to screen the combatants in ships.

Up with your fights and your nettings prepare.