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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Hit


HIT, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive hit

1. To strike or touch, either with or without force. We hit a thing with the finger, or with the head; a cannon ball hits a mast, or a wall.

2. To strike or touch, either with or without force. We hit a thing with the finger, or with the head; a cannon ball hits a mast, or a wall.

The archers hit him. 1 Samuel 31:3.

3. To reach; to attain to.

Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right--

4. To suit; to be conformable.

--Melancholy,

Whose saintly visage is too bright

To hit the sense of human sight.

5. To strike; to touch properly; to offer the right bait.

There you hit him--that argument never fails with him.

To hit off, to strike out; to determine luckily.

1. To represent or describe exactly.

To hit out, to perform by good luck. [Little used.]

HIT, verb intransitive To strike; to meet or come in contact; to clash; followed by against or on.

If bodies be mere extension, how can they move and hit one against another.

Corpuscles meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them.

1. To meet or fall on by good luck; to succeed by accident; not to miss.

And oft it hits

Where hope is coldest, and despair most fits.

2. To strike or reach the intended point; to succeed.

And millions miss for one that hits.

To hit on or upon, to light on; to come to or fall on by chance; to meet or find, as by accident.

None of them hit upon the art.

HIT, noun A striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke or blow that touches any thing.

So he the famed Cilician fencer prais'd,

And at each hit with wonder seems amaz'd.

1. A chance; a casual event; as a lucky hit

2. A lucky chance; a fortunate event.

3. A term in back-gammon. Three hits are equal to a gammon.

HIT, verb intransitive

1. To move by jerks, or with stops; as, in colloquial language, to hitch along.

Whoe'er offends, at some unlucky time

Slides in a verse, or hitches in a rhyme.

2. To become entangled; to be caught or hooked.

3. To hit the legs together in going, as horses. [Not used in the U. States.]

4. To hop; to spring on one leg. [Local.]

5. To move or walk.