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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Humble


HUM'BLE, adjective [Latin humilis.]

1. Low; opposed to high or lofty.

Thy humble nest built on the ground.

2. Low; opposed to lofty or great; mean; not magnificent; as a humble cottage.

A humble roof, and an obscure retreat.

3. Lowly; modest; meek; submissive; opposed to proud, haughty, arrogant or assuming. In an evangelical sense, having a low opinion of one's self, and a deep sense of unworthiness in the sight of God.

God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace to the humble. James 4:6.

Without a humble imitation of the divine author of our blessed religion, we can never hope to be a happy nation.

HUM'BLE, verb transitive To abase; to reduce to a low state. This victory humbled the pride of Rome. The power of Rome was humbled, but not subdued.

1. To crush; to break; to subdue. The battle of Waterloo humbled the power of Buonaparte.

2. To mortify.

3. To make humble or lowly in mind; to abase the pride of; to reduce arrogance and self-dependence; to give a low opinion of one's moral worth; to make meek and submissive to the divine will; the evangelical sense.

Humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you. 1 Peter 5:1.

Hezekiah humbled himself for the pride of his heart. 2 Chronicles 32:1.

4. To make to condescend.

He humbles himself to speak to them.

5. To bring down; to lower; to reduce.

The highest mountains may be humbled into valleys.

6. To deprive of chastity. Deuteronomy 21:1.

To humble one's self, to repent; to afflict one's self for sin; to make contrite.