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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Impute


IMPU'TE, verb transitive [Latin imputo; in and puto, to think, to reckon; properly, to set, to put, to throw to or on.]

1. To charge; to attribute; to set to the account of; generally ill, sometimes good. We impute crimes, sins, trespasses, faults, blame, etc., to the guilty persons. We impute wrong actions to bad motives, or to ignorance, or to folly and rashness. We impute misfortunes and miscarriages to imprudence.

And therefore it was imputed to him for

righteousness. Romans 4:8.

2. To attribute; to ascribe.

I have read a book imputed to lord Bathurst.

3. To reckon to one what does not belong to him.

It has been held that Adam's sin is imputed to all his

posterity.

Thy merit

Imputed shall absolve them who renounce

Their own both righteous and unrighteous deeds.