Loading...

American Dictionary of the English Language

Dictionary Search

Jump


JUMP, verb intransitive

1. To leap; to skip; to spring. Applied to men, it signifies to spring upwards or forwards with both feet, in distinction from hop, which signifies to spring with one foot. A man jumps over a ditch; a beast jumps over a fence. A man jumps upon a horse; a goat jumps from rock to rock.

2. To spring over any thing; to pass to at a leap.

Here, upon this bank and shelve of time,

We'd jump the life to come.

We see a little, presume a great deal, and so jump to the conclusion.

3. To bound; to pass from object to object; to jolt.

The noise of the rattling of the wheels, and of the prancing horses, and of the jumping chariots. Nahum 3.

4. To agree; to tally; to coincide.

In some sort it jumps with my humor.

[This use of the word is now vulgar, and in America, I think, is confined to the single phrase, to jump in judgment.

JUMP, verb transitive To pass by a leap; to pass over eagerly or hastily; as, to jump a stream. [But over is understood.]

JUMP, noun The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.

1. A lucky chance.

JUMP, noun A kind of loose or limber stays or waistcoat, worn by females.

JUMP, adverb Exactly; nicely.