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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Kind


KIND, noun

1. Race; genus; generic class; as in mankind or humankind. In technical language, kind answers to genus.

2. Sort, in a sense more loose than genus; as, there are several kinds of eloquence and of style, many kinds of music, many kinds of government, various kinds of architecture or of painting, various kinds of soil, etc.

3. Particular nature; as laws most perfect in their kind

4. Natural state; produce or commodity, as distinguished from money; as taxes paid in kind

5. Nature; natural propensity or determination.

Some of you, on pure instinct of nature,

Are led by kind t' admire your fellow creature.

6. Manner; way. [Little Used.]

7. Sort. He spoke with a kind of scorn or contempt.

KIND, adjective

1. Disposed to do good to others, and to make them happy by granting their requests, supplying their wants or assisting them in distress; having tenderness or goodness of nature; benevolent; benignant.

God is kind to the unthankful, and to the evil. Luke 6:35.

Be ye kind one to another, tender-hearted. Ephesians 4:32.

2. Proceeding from tenderness or goodness of heart; benevolent; as a kind act; a kind return of favors.