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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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English Language

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Little

LIT'TLE, adjective

1. Small in size or extent; not great or large; as a little body; a little animal; a little piece of ground; a little table; a little book; a little hill; a little distance; a little child.

2. Short in duration; as a little time or season; a little sleep.

3. Small in quantity or amount; as a little hay or grass; a little food; a little sum; a little light; a little air or water.

4. Of small dignity, power or importance.

When thou wast little in thy own sight, wast thou not made the head of the tribes? 1 Samuel 15:17.

5. Of small force or effect; slight; inconsiderable; as little attention or exertions; little effort; little care or diligence, little weight.

LIT'TLE, noun

1. A small quantity or amount. He demanded much and obtained little He had little of his father's liberality.

2. A small space.

Much was in little writ -

3. Any thing small, slight or of inconsiderable importance.

I view with anger and disdain.

How little gives thee joy and pain.

4. Not much.

These they are fitted for, and little else.

LIT'TLE, adverb

1. In a small degree; slightly; as, he is little changed. It is a little discolored.

2. Not much; in a small quantity or space of time. He sleeps little

3. In some degree; slightly; sometimes preceded by adjective The liquor is a little sour or astringent.