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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Miss


MISS, noun

1. The title of a young woman or girl; as little masters and misses.

2. A kept mistress; a prostitute retained; a concubine.

MISS, verb transitive [Latin mitto, misi; omitto, omisi.]

1. To fail in aim; to fail of reaching the object; not to hit; as, to miss the mark; to miss the object intended.

2. To fail of finding the right way; to err in attempting to find; as, to miss the way or the road.

3. To fail of obtaining.

Orgalus feared nothing but to miss Parthenia.

4. To learn or discover that something is wanting, or not where it was supposed to be; as, to miss one's snuff-box; I missed the first volume of Livy.

Neither missed we any thing--. Nothing was missed of all that pertained to him. 1 Samuel 25:15.

5. To be without; as, we cannot miss him.

6. To omit; to pass by; to go without; to fail to have; as, to miss a meal of victuals.

She would never miss one day

A walk so fine, a sight so gay.

7. To perceive the want of.

What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss

He who has a firm sincere friend, may want all the rest without missing them.

8. To fail of seeing or finding.

MISS, verb intransitive To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

Flying bullets now,

To execute his rage, appear too slow;

They miss or sweep but common souls away.

1. Not to succeed; to fail.

Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss--

2. To fail; to miscarry, as by accident.

The invention all admired, and each, how he

To be the inventor missed.

3. To fail to obtain, learn or find; with of.

On the least reflection, we can miss of them.

4. To fail; to mistake.

MISS, noun Loss; want.

There will be no great miss of those which are lost.

1. Mistake; error.

He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar. [Little Used.]

2. Harm from mistake.