Loading...

American Dictionary of the English Language

Dictionary Search

Mold


MOLD, noun [Latin mollis.]

1. Fine soft earth, or earth easily pulverized, such as constitutes soil; as black mold

A mortal substance of terrestrial mold

2. A substance like down which forms on bodies which lie long in warm and damp air. The microscope exhibits this substance as consisting of small plants.

3. Matter of which any thing is formed.

Nature formed me of her softest mold

MOLD, noun

1. The matrix in which any thing is cast and receives its form. Molds are of various kinds. Molds for casting cannon and various vessels, are composed of some species of earth, particularly clay. Molds for other purposes consist of a cavity in some species of metal, cut or formed to the shape designed, or are otherwise formed, each for its particular use.

2. Cast; form; as a writer of vulgar mold

3. The suture or contexture of the skull.

4. In ship-building, a thin flexible piece of timber, used as a pattern by which to form the curves of the timbers and compassing pieces.

5. Among gold beaters, a number of pieces of vellum or a like substance, laid over one another, between which the leaves of gold and silver are laid for beating.

MOLD, verb transitive To cause to contract mold

1. To cover with mold or soil.

MOLD, verb intransitive To contract mold; to become moldy.

MOLD, verb transitive To form into a particular shape; to shape; to model.

He forgeth and moldeth metals.

Did I request them, Maker, from my clay

To mold me man?

1. To knead; as, to mold dough or bread.