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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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English Language

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Mortal

MOR'TAL, adjective [Latin mortalis, from mors, death, or morior, to die, that is, to fall.]

1. Subject to death; destined to die. Man is mortal

2. Deadly; destructive to life; causing death, or that must cause death; as a mortal wound; mortal poison.

The fruit

Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste

Brought death into the world, and all our woe--

3. Bringing death; terminating life.

Safe in the hand of one disposing power,

Or in the natal or the mortal hour.

4. Deadly in malice or purpose; as a mortal foe. In colloquial language, a mortal foe is an inveterate foe.

5. Exposing to certain death; incurring the penalty of death; condemned to be punished with death; not venial; as a mortal sin.

6. Human; belonging to man who is mortal; as mortal wit or knowledge; mortal power.

The voice of God

To mortal ear is dreadful.

7. Extreme; violent. [Not elegant.]

The nymph grew pale, and in a mortal fright--

MOR'TAL, noun Man; a being subject to death; a human being.

Warn poor mortals left behind.

It is often used in ludicrous and colloquial language.

I can behold no mortal now.