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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Most


MOST, adjective superlative of more.

1. Consisting of the greatest number. That scheme of life is to be preferred, which presents a prospect of the most advantages with the fewest inconveniences.

MOST men will proclaim every one his own goodness. Proverbs 20:6.

2. consisting of the greatest quantity; greatest; as the most part of the land or the mountain.

MOST, adverb In the greatest or highest degree. Pursue that course of life which will most tend to produce private happiness and public usefulness. Contemplations on the works of God expand the mind and tend to produce most sublime views of his power and wisdom.

As most is used to express the superlative degree, it is used before any adjective; as most vile, most wicked, most illustrious.

MOST, noun [used as a substitute for a noun, when the noun is omitted or understood.]

1. The greatest number or part.

Then he began to upbraid the cities wherein most of his mighty works were done. Matthew 11:20.

[This use seems to have resulted form the omission of part, or some similar word, and most in this case signifies greatest, that is, the greatest part.]

2. The most the greatest value, amount or advantage, or the utmost in extent, degree or effect.

A covetous man makes the most of what he has, and can get.

At the most the greatest degree or quantity; the utmost extent. Stock brings six per cent. interest at the most often less.