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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Mystery

MYS'TERY, noun [Latin mysterium; Gr. a secret. This word in Greek is rendered also murium latibulum; but probably both senses are from that of hiding or shutting; Gr. to shut, to conceal.

1. A profound secret; something wholly unknown or something kept cautiously concealed, and therefore exciting curiosity or wonder; such as the mystery of the man with the iron mask in France.

2. In religion, any thing in the character or attributes of

God, or in the economy of divine providence, which is not revealed to man.

3. That which is beyond human comprehension until explained. In this sense, mystery often conveys the idea of something awfully sublime or important; something that excites wonder.

Great is the mystery of godliness. 1 Timothy 3:9.

Having made known to us the mystery of his will. Ephesians 1:9.

We speak the wisdom of God in a mystery 1 Corinthians 2:7.

4. An enigma; any thing artfully made difficult.

5. A kind of ancient dramatic representation.

6. A trade; a calling; any mechanical occupation which supposes skill or knowledge peculiar to those who carry it on, and therefore a secret to others.

[The word in the latter sense has been supposed to have a different origin from the foregoing, viz.]