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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Observe

OBSERVE, verb transitive obzerv'. [Latin observo; ob and servo, to keep or hold. The sense is to hold in view, or to keep the eyes on.]

1. To see or behold with some attention; to notice; as, to observe a halo round the moon; I observed a singular phenomenon; we observe strangers or their dress. I saw the figure, but observed nothing peculiar in it.

2. To take notice or cognizance of by the intellect. We observe nice distinctions in arguments, or a peculiar delicacy of thought.

3. To utter or express, as a remark, opinion or sentiment; to remark. He observed that no man appears great to his domestics.

4. To keep religiously; to celebrate.

A night to be much observed to the Lord. Exodus 12:17.

Ye shall observe the feast of unleavened bread. Exodus 12:17.

Ye observe days, and months, and times, and years. Galatians 4:10.

5. To keep or adhere to in practice; to comply with; to obey; as, to observe the laws of the state; to observe the rules and regulations of a society.

Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you. Matthew 28:20.

6. To practice.

In the days of Enoch, the people observed not circumcision or the sabbath.

OBSERVE, verb intransitive observ'.

1. To remark. I have heard the gentleman's arguments, and shall hereafter observe upon them.

2. To be attentive.