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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Pall


PALL, noun [Latin pallium.]

1. A cloke; a mantle of state.

2. The mantle of an archbishop.

3. The cloth thrown over a dead body at funerals.

PALL, noun In heraldry, a figure like the Greek.

PALL, verb transitive To cloke; to cover or invest.

PALL, verb intransitive [Gr. old.]

1. To become vapid; to lose strength, life, spirit or taste; to become insipid; as, the liquor palls.

Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover,

Fades in the eye and palls upon the sense.

PALL, verb transitive To make vapid or insipid.

Reason and reflection--blunt the edge of the keenest desires, and pall all his enjoyments.

1. To make spiritless; to dispirit; to depress.

The more we raise our love,

The more we pall and cool and kill his ardor.

2. To weaken; to impair; as, to pall fortune.

3. To cloy; as the palled appetite.