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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Pitch


PITCH, noun [Latin pix; Gr. most probably named from its thickness or inspissation; Latin figo.]

1. A thick tenacious substance, the juice of a species of pine or fir called abies picea, obtained by incision from the bark of the tree. When melted and pressed in bags of cloth, it is received into barrels. This is white or Burgundy pitch; by mixture with lampblack it is converted into black pitch When kept long in fusion with vinegar, it becomes dry and brown, and forms colophony. The smoke of pitch condensed forms lampblack.

2. The resin of pine, or turpentine, inspissated; used in caulking ships and paying the sides and bottom.

PITCH, noun [from the root of pike, peak.]

1. Literally, a point; hence, any point or degree of elevation; as a high pitch; lowest pitch

How high a pitch his resolution soars.

Alcibiades was one of the best orators of his age, notwithstanding he lived when learning was at its highest pitch

2. Highest rise.

3. Size; stature.

So like in person, garb and pitch

4. Degree; rate.

No pitch of glory from the grave is free.

5. The point where a declivity begins, or the declivity itself; descent; slope; as the pitch of a hill.

6. The degree of descent or declivity.

7. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.

8. Degree of elevation of the key-note of a tune or of any note.

PITCH, verb transitive [Latin figo, to fix, and uniting pike, pique with fix.]

1. To throw or thrust, and primarily, to thrust a long or pointed object; hence, to fix; to plant; to set; as, to pitch a tent or pavilion, that is, to set the stakes.

2. To throw at a point; as, to pitch quoits.

3. To throw headlong; as, to pitch one in the mire or down a precipice.

4. To throw with a fork; as, to pitch hay or sheaves of corn.

5. To regulate or set the key-note of a tune in music.

6. To set in array; to marshal or arrange in order; used chiefly in the participle; as a pitched battle.

7. [from pitch ] To smear or pay over with pitch; as, to pitch the seams of a ship.

PITCH, verb intransitive To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight.

Take a branch of the tree on which the bees pitch and wipe the hive.

1. To fall headlong; as, to pitch from a precipice; to pitch on the head.

2. To plunge; as, to pitch into a river.

3. To fall; to fix choice; with on or upon.

PITCH upon the best course of life, and custom will render it the most easy.

4. To fix a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.

Laban with his brethren pitched in the mount of Gilead. Genesis 31:25.

5. In navigation, to rise and fall, as the head and stern of a ship passing over waves.

6. To flow or fall precipitously, as a river.

Over this rock, the river pitches in one entire sheet.