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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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English Language

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Praise

PRAISE, noun s as z. [Latin pretium.]

1. Commendation bestowed on a person for his personal virtues or worthy actions, on meritorious actions themselves, or on any thing valuable; approbation expressed in words or song. praise may be expressed by an individual, and in this circumstance differs from fame, renown, and celebrity, which are the expression of the approbation of numbers, or public commendation. When praise is applied to the expression of public approbation, it may be synonymous with renown, or nearly so. A man may deserve the praise of an individual, or of a nation.

There are men who always confound the praise of goodness with the practice.

2. The expression of gratitude for personal favors conferred; a glorifying or extolling.

He hath put a new song into my mouth, even praise to our God. Psalms 40:3.

3. The object, ground or reason of praise

He is thy praise and he is thy God. Deuteronomy 10:21.

PRAISE, verb transitive [Latin tollo, extollo; pretium.]

1. To commend; to applaud; to express approbation of personal worth or actions.

We praise not Hector, though his name we know

Is great in arms; 'tis hard to praise a foe.

2. To extol in words or song; to magnify; to glorify on account of perfections or excellent works.

PRAISE him, all his angels, praise ye him, all his hosts. Psalms 148:1.

3. To express gratitude for personal favors. Psa 138.

4. To do honor to; to display the excellence of.

All thy works shall praise thee, O Lord. Psa 145.