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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Prevent

PREVENT', verb transitive [Latin proevenio, supra.]

1. To go before; to precede.

I prevented the dawning of the morning, and cried. Psalms 119:148.

2. To precede, as something unexpected or unsought.

The days of my affliction prevented me. Job 30:27.

2 Samuel 22:6.

3. To go before; to precede; to favor by anticipation or by hindering distress or evil.

The God of my mercy shall prevent me. Psalms 59:10.

PREVENT us, O Lord, in all our doings, with thy most gracious favor.

4. To anticipate.

Their ready guilt preventing thy commands.

5. To preoccupy; to pre-engage; to attempt first.

Thou hast prevented us with overtures of love.

[In all the preceding senses, the word is obsolete.]

6. To hinder; to obstruct; to intercept the approach or access of. This is now the only sense. No foresight or care will prevent every misfortune. Religion supplies consolation under afflictions which cannot be prevented. It is easier to prevent an evil than to remedy it.

Too great confidence in success, is the likeliest to prevent it.

PREVENT', verb intransitive To come before the usual time. [Not in use.]