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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Private

PRI'VATE, adjective [Latin privatus, from privo, to bereave, properly to strip or separate; privus, singular, several, peculiar to one's self, that is, separate; rapio, diripio, eripio; privo for perivo or berivo.]

1. Properly, separate; unconnected with others; hence, peculiar to one's self; belonging to or concerning an individual only; as a man's private opinion, business or concerns; private property; the king's private purse; a man's private expenses. Charge the money to my private account in the company's books.

2. Peculiar to a number in a joint concern, to a company or body politic; as the private interest of a family, of a company or of a state; opposed to public, or to the general interest of nations.

3. Sequestered from company or observation; secret; secluded; as a private cell; a private room or apartment; private prayer.

4. Not publicly known; not open; as a private negotiation.

5. Not invested with public office or employment; as a private man or citizen; private lift.

A private person may arrest a felon.

6. Individual; personal; in contradistinction from public or national; as private interest.

Private way, in law, is a way or passage in which a man has an interest and right, though the ground may belong to another person. In common language, a private way may be a secret way, one not known or public.

A private act or statute, is one which operates on an individual or company only; opposed to a general law, which operates on the whole community.

A private nuance or wrong, is one which affects an individual.

In private secretly; not openly or publicly.

PRI'VATE, noun A secret message; particular business. [Unusual.]

1. A common soldier.