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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Ransom


RAN'SOM, noun

1. The money or price paid for the redemption of a prisoner or slave, or for goods captured by an enemy; that which procures the release of a prisoner or captive, or of captured property, and restores the one to liberty and the other to the original owner.

By his captivity in Austria, and the heavy ransom he paid for his liberty, Richard was hindered from pursuing the conquest of Ireland.

2. Release from captivity, bondage or the possession of an enemy. They were unable to procure the ransom of the prisoners.

3. In law, a sum paid for the pardon of some great offense and the discharge of the offender; or a fine paid in lieu of corporal punishment.

4. In Scripture, the price paid for a forfeited life, or for delivery or release from capital punishment.

Then he shall give for the ransom of his life, whatever is laid upon him. Exodus 21:30.

5. The price paid for procuring the pardon of sins and the redemption of the sinner from punishment.

Deliver him from going down to the pit; I have found a ransom Job 33:24.

The Son of man came - to give his life a ransom for many. Matthew 20:28. Mark 10:45.

RAN'SOM, verb transitive

1. To redeem from captivity or punishment by paying an equivalent; applied to persons; as, to ransom prisoners from an enemy.

2. To redeem from the possession of an enemy by paying a price deemed equivalent; applied to goods or property.

3. In Scripture, to redeem from the bondage of sin, and from the punishment to which sinners are subjected by the divine law.

The ransomed of the Lord shall return. Isaiah 35:10.

4. To rescue; to deliver. Hosea 13.