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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Respect


RESPECT', verb transitive [Latin respecto, or respectus, from respicio; re and specio, to view.]

1. To regard; to have regard to in design or purpose.

In orchards and gardens, we do not so much respect beauty, as variety of ground for fruits, trees and herbs.

2. To have regard to, in relation or connection; to relate to. The treaty particularly respects our commerce.

3. To view or consider with some degree of reverence; to esteem as possessed of real worth.

I always loved and respected Sir William.

4. To look towards.

Palladius adviseth the front of his house should so respect the south. [Not in use.]

To respect the person, to suffer the opinion or judgment to be influenced or biased by a regard to the outward circumstances of a person, to the prejudice of right and equity.

Thou shalt not respect the person of the poor. Leviticus 19:15.

Neither doth God respect any person. 2 Samuel 14:14.

RESPECT', noun [Latin respectus.]

1. Regard; attention.

2. That estimation or honor in which men hold the distinguished worth or substantial good qualities of others. It expresses less than reverence and veneration, which regard elders and superiors; whereas respect may regard juniors and inferiors.

RESPECT regards the qualities of the mind, or the actions which characterize those qualities.

Seen without awe, and serv'd without respect

3. That deportment or course of action which proceeds from esteem; regard; due attention; as, to treat a person with respect

These same men treat the sabbath with little respect

4. Good will; favor.

The Lord had respect to Abel and his offering. Genesis 4:4.

5. Partial regard; undue bias to the prejudice of justice; as the phrase, respect of persons. 1 Peter 1:17. James 2:1. Proverbs 24:23.

6. Respected character; as persons of the best respect in Rome.

7. Consideration; motive in reference to something.

Whatever secret respects were likely to move them -

8. Relation; regard; reference; followed by of, but more properly by to.

They believed but one Supreme Deity, which, with respect to the benefits men received from him, had several titles.