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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Revive


REVI'VE, verb intransitive [Latin revivisco; re and vivo, to live.]

1. To return to life; to recover life.

The soul of the child came into him again, and he revived. 1 Kings 17:22. Romans 14:9.

2. To recover new life or vigor; to be reanimated after depression.

When he saw the wagons which Joseph had sent to carry him, the spirit of Jacob their father revived. Genesis 45:27.

3. To recover from a state of neglect, oblivion, obscurity or depression. Learning revived in Europe after the middle ages.

4. In chimistry, to recover its natural state, as a metal.

Sin revives, when the conscience is awakened by a conviction of guilt. Romans 7:9.

REVI'VE, verb transitive

1. To bring again to life; to reanimate.

2. To raise from languor, depression or discouragement; to rouse; as, to revive the spirits or courage.

3. To renew; to bring into action after a suspension; as, to revive a project or scheme that had been laid aside.

4. To renew in the mind or memory; to recall.

The mind has the power in many cases to revive ideas or perceptions, which it has once had.

5. To recover from a state of neglect or depression; as, to revive letters or learning.

6. To recomfort; to quicken; to refresh with joy or hope.

Wilt thou not revive us again? Psalms 85:6.

7. To bring again into notice.

Revive the libels born to die.

8. In chimistry, to restore or reduce to its natural state or to its metallic state; as, to revive a metal after calcination.