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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Revolt


REVOLT', verb intransitive [Latin revolvo; re and volvo, to turn. Eng. wallow.]

1. To fall off or turn from one to another.

2. To renounce allegiance and subjection to one's prince or state; to reject the authority of a sovereign; as a province or a number of people. It is not applied to individuals.

The Edomites revolted from under the hand of Judah.

2 Chronicles 21:10.

3. To change. [Not in use.]

4. In Scripture, to disclaim allegiance and subjection to God; to reject the government of the King of kings. Isaiah 31:6.

REVOLT', verb transitive

1. To turn; to put to flight; to overturn.

2. To shock; to do violence to; to cause to shrink or turn away with abhorrence; as, to revolt the mind or the feelings.

Their honest pride of their purer religion had revolted the Babylonians.

REVOLT', noun

1. Desertion; change of sides; more correctly, a renunciation of allegiance and subjection to one's prince or government; as the revolt of a province of the Roman empire.

2. Gross departure from duty.

3. In Scripture, a rejection of divine government; departure from God; disobedience. Isaiah 59:13.

4. A revolter. [Not in use.]