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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Ring


RING, noun

1. A circle, or a circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop. Thus we say of men, they formed themselves into a ring to see a wrestling match. Rings of gold were made for the ark. Exodus 25:12. Rings of gold or other material are worn on the fingers and sometimes in the ears, as ornaments.

2. A circular course.

Place me, O place me in the dusty ring where youthful charioteers contend for glory.

RING, noun [from the verb.]

1. A sound; particularly, the sound of metals; as the ring of a bell.

2. Any loud sound, or the sounds of numerous voices; or sound continued, repeated or reverberated; as the ring of acclamations.

3. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.

RING, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive rung.

To cause to sound, particularly by striking a metallic body; as, to ring a bell. This word expresses appropriately the sounding of metals.

RING, verb transitive [from the noun.

1. To encircle.

2. To fit with rings, as the fingers, or as a swine's snout. Farmers ring swine to prevent their rooting.

And ring these fingers with thy household worms.

RING, verb intransitive

1. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one.

2. To practice the art of making music with bells.

3. To sound; to resound.

With sweeter notes each rising temple rung.

4. To utter, as a bell; to sound.

The shardborn beetle with his drowsy hums, hath rung night's yawning peal.

5. To tinkle; to have the sensation of sound continued.

My ears still ring with noise.

6. To be filled with report or talk. The whole town rings with his fame.