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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Rogue


ROGUE, noun rog. [Gr., Eng. rogue by transposition of letters. The word arga, in the laws of the Longobards, denotes a cuckold.]

1. In law, a vagrant; a sturdy beggar; a vagabond. Persons of this character were, by the ancient laws of England, to be punished by whipping and having the ear bored with a hot iron.

2. A knave; a dishonest person; applied now, I believe, exclusively to males. This word comprehends thieves and robbers, but is generally applied to such as cheat and defraud in mutual dealings, or to counterfeiters.

The rogue and fool by fits is fair and wise.

3. A name of slight tenderness and endearment.

Alas, poor rogue I think indeed she loves.

4. A wag.

ROGUE, verb intransitive rog.

1. To wander; to play the vagabond. [Little used.]

2. To play knavish tricks. [Little used.]