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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Sacrament

SAC'RAMENT, noun [Latin sacramentum, an oath, from sacer, sacred.]

1. Among ancient christian writers, a mystery. [Not in use.]

2. An oath; a ceremony producing an obligation; but not used in this general sense.

3. In present usage, an outward and visible sign of inward and spiritual grace; or more particularly, a solemn religious ceremony enjoined by Christ, the head of the christian church, to be observed by his followers, by which their special relation to him is created, or their obligations to him renewed and ratified. Thus baptism is called a sacrament for by it persons are separated from the world, brought into Christ's visible church, and laid under particular obligations to obey his precepts. The eucharist or communion of the Lord's supper, is also a sacrament for by commemorating the death and dying love of Christ, christians avow their special relation to him, and renew their obligations to be faithful to their divine Master. When we use sacrament without any qualifying word, we mean by it,

4. The eucharist or Lord's supper.

SAC'RAMENT, verb transitive To bind by an oath. [Not used.]