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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Seed


SEED, noun

1. The substance, animal or vegetable, which nature prepares for the reproduction and conservation of the species. The seeds of plants are a deciduous part, containing the rudiments of a new vegetable. In some cases, the seeds costitute the fruit or valuable part of plants, as in the case of wheat and other esculent grain; sometimes the seeds are inclosed in fruit, as in apples and melons. When applied to animal matter, it has no plural.

2. That from which any thing springs; first principle; original; as the seeds of virtue or vice.

3. Principle of production.

Praise of great acts he scatters as a seed. Waller.

4. Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as the seed of Abraham; the seed of David. In this sense, the word is applied to one person, or to any number collectively, and admits of the plural form; but rarely used in the plural.

5. Race; generation; birth.

Of mortal seed they were not held. Waller.

SEED, verb intransitive

1. To grow to maturity, so as to produce seed. Maiz will not seed in a cool climate.

2. To shed the seed

SEED, verb transitive To sow; to sprinkle with seed which germinates and takes root.