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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Send


SEND, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive sent.

1. In adjective general sense, to throw, cast or thrust; to impel or drive by force to a distance, either with the hand or with an instrument or by other means. We send a ball with the hand or with a bat; a bow sends an arrow; a cannon sends a shot; a trumpet sends the voice much farther than the unassisted organs of speech.

2. To cause to be conveyed or transmitted; as, to send letters or dispatches from one country to another.

3. To cause to go or pass from place to place; as, to send a messenger from London to Madrid.

4. To commission, autorize or direct to go and act.

I have not sent these prophets, yet they ran. Jeremiah 23:1.

5. To cause to come or fall; to bestow.

He sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. Matthew 5:45.

6. To cause to come or fall; to inflict.

The Lord shall send upon thee cursing, vexation and rebuke. Duet. 28.

7. To propagate; to diffuse.

Cherubic songs by night from neighb'ring hills

Aerial music send. Milton.

To send away, to dismiss; to cause to depart.

To send forth or out, to produce; to put or bring forth; as, a tree sends forth branches.

2. To emit; as flowers send forth their fragrance.

SEND, verb intransitive To dispatch an agent or messenger for some purpose.

See ye how this son of a murderer hath sent to take away my head? 2 Kings 6:13.

So we say, we sent to invite guests; we sent to inquire into the facts.

To send for, to request or require by message to come or be brought; as, to send for a physician; to send for a coach. But these expressions are elliptical.