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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Stoop


STOOP, verb intransitive

1. To bend the body downward and forward; as, to stoop to pick up a book.

2. To bend or lean forward; to incline forward in standing or walking. We often see men stoop in standing or walking, either from habit or from age.

3. To yield; to submit; to bend by compulsion; as, Carthage at length stooped to Rome.

4. To descend from rank or dignity; to condescend. IN modern days, attention to agriculture is not called stooping in men of property.

Where men of great wealth stoop to husbandry, it multiplieth riches exceedingly.

5. To yield; to be inferior.

These are arts, my prince, in which our Zama does not stoop to Rome.

6. To come down on prey, as a hawk.

The bird of Jove stoopd from his airy tour, two birds of gayest plume before him drove.

7. To alight from the wing.

And stoop with closing pinions from above.

8. To sink to a lower place.

Cowering low with blandishments, each bird stoopd on his wing.

STOOP, verb transitive

1. To cause to incline downward; to sink; as, to stoop a cask of liquor.

2. To cause to submit. [Little used.]

STOOP, noun

1. The act of bending the body forward; inclination forward.

2. Descent from dignity or superiority; condescension.

Can any loyal subject see with patience such a stoop from sovereignty?

3. Fall of a bird on his prey.

4. In America, a kind of shed, generally open, but attached to a house; also, an open place for seats at a door.

STOOP, noun

1. A vessel of liquor; as a stoop of wine or ale.

2. A post fixed in the earth. [Local.]