Loading...

Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
OF THE
English Language

Dictionary Search

Suffer

SUF'FER, verb transitive [Latin suffero; sub, under, and fero, to bear; as we say, to undergo.]

1. To feel or bear what is painful, disagreeable or distressing, either to the body or mind; to undergo. We suffer pain of body; we suffer grief of mind. The criminal suffers punishment; the sinner suffers the pangs of conscience in this life, and is condemned to suffer the wrath of an offended God. We often suffer wrong; we suffer abuse; we suffer injustice.

2. To endure; to support; to sustain; not to sink under.

Our spirit and strength entire,

Strongly to suffer and support our pains.

3. To allow; to permit; not to forbid or hinder. Will you suffer yourself to be insulted?

I suffer them to enter and possess.

Thou shalt in any wise rebuke thy neighbor, and not suffer sin upon him. Lex.19.

4. To undergo; to be affected by. Substances suffer an entire change by the action of fire, or by entering into new combinations.

5. To sustain; to be affected by; as, to suffer loss or damage.

SUF'FER, verb intransitive To feel or undergo pain of body or mind; to bear what is inconvenient. We suffer with pain, sickness or sorrow. We suffer with anxiety. We suffer by evils past and by anticipating others to come. We suffer from fear and from disappointed hopes.

1. To undergo, as punishment.

The father was first condemned to suffer on a day appointed, and the son afterwards, the day following.

2. To be injured; to sustain loss or damage. A building suffers for want of seasonable repairs. It is just that we should suffer for neglect of duty.

Public business suffers by private infirmities.